• copyright

    The Contract Without End

    by  • August 16, 2016 • copyright • 6 Comments

    This case relates to some kind of intellectual property, denominated in the agreement as “copyright” and “industrial design” rights, although the true nature of the rights was not examined by the court. It’s a mess of a problem, with a “solution” that turned out not to work quite as the parties planned. I’ll set...

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    The 2d Circuit Is Part Way There on Eden Toys

    by  • August 1, 2016 • copyright • 0 Comments

    I have long complained about a defense that comes up in copyright cases, originating with the Second Circuit’s Eden Toys, Inc. v. Florelee Undergarment Co. Eden Toys involved a challenge to standing based on the timing of of an exclusive license. The case has heavily-quoted language about the challenge: In this case, in which...

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    Three Registrations, One Work: The Answer

    by  • April 29, 2016 • copyright • 2 Comments

    I previously posted about a copyright infringement suit with three registrations for the same work, brought by William L. Roberts aka Rick Ross, and Andrew Harr and Jermaine Jackson aka The Runners, alleging infringement of a musical work titled “Hustlin’.” I asked what happens on a motion for summary judgment on the questions “was...

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    Three Registrations, One Work: A Quiz

    by  • April 27, 2016 • copyright • 0 Comments

    (Explicit lyrics) We have a copyright infringement lawsuit filed by William L. Roberts, aka Rick Ross, and Andrew Harr and Jermaine Jackson, aka The Runners, alleging infringement of a musical work titled “Hustlin’.” In 2001, Roberts signed a recording agreement with Slip ‘N Slide Records (SNS), a name used interchangeably in agreements with First-N-Gold...

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    The Security Interest Quiz Answer

    by  • January 20, 2016 • copyright • 0 Comments

    I previously offered a quiz asking you to decide who, between a secured party and a licensee, owned the rights in an improved version of software. And the answer is — Pro Marketing, owner of the security interest. I missed it, but it is a straightforward answer. The key is that the collateral included...

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    A Security Interest Quiz

    by  • January 18, 2016 • copyright • 1 Comment

    Priva Technologies didn’t do well in its business. It financed its business, first, by taking a loan and granting a security interest in assets, including in its software, and second, as part of a reorganization, by assigning the improvements in the software to a licensee. Then it shuttered. Who owns the improvements? The original...

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    “By Operation of Law” Addendum

    by  • December 14, 2015 • copyright • 0 Comments

    I recently chided a court for not recognizing that one of the parties was claiming ownership of copyright “by operation of law,” specifically “under the operation of California law … governing partnerships, promoters, agents, fiduciaries and cofounders, not as a question of employment, work for hire … or joint work.” The court never reached...

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    “By Operation of Law”

    by  • December 3, 2015 • copyright • 3 Comments

    I’m seeing what I believe is a misunderstanding of the statutory section describing transfer of copyright. Section 204(a) of the Copyright Act, titled “Execution of Transfers of Copyright Ownership,” says A transfer of copyright ownership, other than by operation of law, is not valid unless an instrument of conveyance, or a note or memorandum...

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    Infringement Without Confusion?

    by  • November 9, 2015 • copyright, trademark • 8 Comments

    It’s a simple case, but simple doesn’t mean you get to take shortcuts on the legal rationale. At the end of 1998 Ford and ThermoAnalytics entered into a License Agreement for RadTherm software for heat mapping. In the agreement, FGTI (Ford Global Technologies, Inc.) granted ThermoAnalytics an exclusive license to develop and commercialize “FGTI...

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    A Proper Copyright Assignment

    by  • November 2, 2015 • copyright • 1 Comment

    I have called Righthaven the gift that keeps on giving. In Righthaven, the plaintiff tried to obscure the fact that there wasn’t a true copyright assignment by putting the relevant terms in different agreements. Righthaven, a copyright troll, eventually got whacked for it by the 9th Circuit. Now, when defendants see any kind of...

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